Thursday’s Numbers

There were 301 new listings today and 231 sales, for a sell/list of 76.74%.  Of the sales 38,  or 16.45%, went over list.  15 of those were on the Westside. 2 were in East Van,  2 in Richmond, 4 in New West, 4 in North Van, 1 in Maple Ridge, 9 in Burnaby and 1 in Surrey. 

Average list price of the sales was $583,741; average sales price was $575,936, a difference of $7,805, meaning the average sale went for 1.79% under list price. 20 properties went for list price. One property went for 29%($241,000) under list while the highest over list was 13% ($141,000) over .

There were 22 (yeah, 22!) million dollar plus properties sold, with  four over $2 million. Average days on market to sale was 27.

There were 73 price changes, of which 5, or 6.85%, were increases. The average original list price of price changes was $655,090; the average new price was $635,365, a difference of $19,725, meaning the average price change was -2.85%.  Average days on market to price change was 52 days.

Inventory in my target area rose  to 11,286, while over 90s dropped  to 1,635, or 14.49%.

0.60% of all active listings in my target area had their prices reduced today.  The 14 day rolling sell/list was 63.22%.

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66 Comments

Filed under Daily Numbers

66 responses to “Thursday’s Numbers

  1. Jim

    Solidly back in seller’s market territory. Wha’ happened?
    So much for my theory that Canada’s economy was in some small way linked to the U.S.

  2. Snick

    As mentioned before, we move in tandem with the California market.

    I would expect things to be QUITE slow this summer throughout the GVRD. (and, summer is not far off!)

  3. Jim

    Snick:

    You are right of course. If we don’t see a serious slowdown in sales this summer with YOY increased inventory, I will then conclude we have decoupled from the US economy, currenty resonsible for consuming almost 70 % of our exports. I believe domestic homeowner spending makes up a big chunk of the rest of our GDP. I will kick myself(hard) if I have left 3 or 400k on the table in the Westside SFH market.
    The more likely scenario is smug self congratulatory smirking for waiting a few months.

  4. M-

    Jim: we never left the seller’s market territory. It was a “balanced market” during the winter, and for the last few months it has been a seller’s market. This week has been a particularly strong week.

    It may also be that these are the last of the irrational buyers, buying for the sake of the mania, in a panic to get a property, any property, before they’re priced out forever.

    It is *trending* towards a balanced market. If the trend continues, which I believe it will, then we’ll hit a balanced market in another 2-3 months, and maybe even hit a buyer’s market in the fall. Next spring, I believe, will be a balanced market, and the following spring (2009) will be a buyer’s market, continuing that way for a few years. Time will tell.

  5. robchipman

    Jim/Snick:

    Disagreeing that we follow the national US real estate market or the California market isn’t the same as saying the Canadian economy isn’t deeply entangled with the US economy.

    We are obviously subject to US economic problems. We’ve all heard the saying that when the US catches a cold we get pneumonia. There’s a lot of truth there. However, a weak US economy doesn’t always mean a weak Vancouver real estate market.

    The US national market is very diverse. In terms of sales volumes and prices some areas are doing quite well and other areas are taking it in the ear. The two key points to recognize is the diversity and the currently negative sum of the parts. Does our market follow the whole US market, or only California? If Florida, Las Vegas and Phoenix collapse, are we ok if California recovers? And considering that California has an economy bigger than most countries, do we follow SoCal, or Northern California, or what? And if the Vancouver real estate market is recognized as usually running counter to the rest of the country, does that mean that if California goes in the toilet Ontario real estate is a good buy?

    So yes, in broad economic terms we’re linked to the States, but I don’t buy that we move in tandem with or follow any particular US market by 6, 12 or 18 months.

  6. Jim

    Well Rob, then I guess we can expect our housing to out perform inflation by say 3 % per year,or 5% going forward? Its been out performing by 10 to 15% per year for a few years. Thus with no correction back to historical norms ,or at least in line with income growth, we are truly forging a new pathway, versus other North American hyper inflated cities, which are seeing real price declines YOY.
    You bet with your way, with your money, and your clients’ money, and I will bet my way,with mine. This week we bought an acre of waterfront in the gulf islands as a hedge against calling this wrong.

  7. robchipman

    Jim:

    You can guess what you like. I can’t recall ever saying that we’d outperform anything by any amount. I do recall saying that the market would change. I do recall saying that simplistic comparisons don’t really stand up or contribute to greater understanding. I do recall saying that US economic performance will have an impact on us.

    In terms of how I’d bet with my or my clients’ money, I think I’ve outlined some pretty safe approaches.

    I think that what we disagree with is what action is wise given our prediction of the future. We both admit that we don’t know how much or when, in terms of a correction. We’ve both proven, repeatedly, that we can’t pinpoint those quantities. You’ve taken action on that by selling, which is fine. I’ve taken action by selling, holding and buying, dependent always on some consistent rules. That’s not a huge disagreement.

  8. Anonymous

    Hi Jim, I’m confused, “versus other North American hyper inflated cities, which are seeing real price declines YOY”

    Which North American cities are you referring to with real price declines YOY ?

    I did some googling and LA is up, Seattle is up and San Francisco is up, am I missing something ? Sure volume is down in all of these cities.

  9. Jim

    Too many brain dead anonymous posters. I quit this blog. Good luck with your investments Rob.

  10. Dyugle

    [posts with too many links get tagged as potential spam and need my moderation, which is why this didn’t turn up as soon as you posted it]

    here is the shiller index for SF
    http://www.paperdinero.com/CSI.aspx?id=SFXR&yoy=1
    here is the one for LA
    http://www.paperdinero.com/CSI.aspx?id=LXXR&yoy=1
    here is the one for Phoenix
    http://www.paperdinero.com/CSI.aspx?id=PHXR&yoy=1
    The best city appears to be Seatle and the worst may be Detroit but overall the trend is down. Even in New York the prices are falling.
    http://www.paperdinero.com/CSI.aspx?id=NYXR&yoy=1

  11. Craigy

    Jim,

    You clearly have issues with anyone disagreeing with you since your responses alternate between sarcasm and disgust. You might want to accept the fact that there may be variables influencing the real estate market that you don’t understand or factor into your analysis. Hubris isn’t helpful.

  12. whitebear

    [posts with too many links get tagged as potential spam and need my moderation, which is why this didn’t turn up as soon as you posted it]

    Do you really believe inflation is below 3%? http://www.shadowstats.com/cgi-bin/sgs/data
    What the government defined as CPI is just price index of a bunch of goods of its choosing and manipulation. Ever wonder why the US government stops publishing the M3 monetary statistics? According to Mises Von Ludwig (http://www.mises.org), inflation should be defined as increase of the monetary base. Granted, it is US data. But, you can bet that Canada is no better than the US when it comes to telling the common folks the true inflation. What you are seeing as a housing boom is nothing other than the loonie losing its purchasing value year after year. Check out this 5 year of CAD vs. Gold. http://www.kitco.com/gold_currency/charts.htm?CAD . The loonie has lost close to 40% of its value against Gold just in the last 5 years. Of course, the USD fared worse with its 50% loss. Face it, the world is engaging in this competitive currency devaluation scheme. Each country is trying to outwin each other in depreciating its currency. Sadly, inflation is not a game in which everyone lose and that’s the reason why the governments have been able to indulge in this inflation game for so long. The savers are the losers. The borrowers are the winners. How long will this game last? Who knows?

  13. Jaymo

    Isn’t an enigma always perplexing?

  14. Anonymous2

    Jim: …smug self congratulatory smirking…

    So your usual tone then?

  15. Annon

    There is no need for the bears to be discouraged by recent hikes in the real estate market. Spring sales are supposed to be higher statistically and honestly it isn’t that exciting anyway. So I have heard many friends/friends of friends aged 25~30 bought condos that are yet to be built. This is a sign that the market may be running out of steam because after the youngest possible buyers are hooked too…. the number of buyers are limited. Remember Henry Ford dumped all his stocks when he heard an elevator boy talking about investing in stocks? Look at real estate markets in US, UK, Spain, China, Mexico, New Zealand …. There seems to be a global trend becoming more and more clear.

  16. Realtorwoman

    As Market Cools, Home Buyers Seek a Way Out
    By Michael Corkery and Ruth Simon

    “In the latest fallout from the housing market’s decline, disputes are breaking out between builders and buyers who signed contracts for new homes and condos when the market was hot — and now want to get out of them.”

    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB117824625742291888.html?mod=home_whats_news_us

    This will be the state of affairs in Vancouver by next year

  17. megatron

    Someone mentioned 25-30 year old first time buyers buying condos. I’ve witnessed more than a half dozen 22-24 year olds buying condos in my circle of friends (mostly pre-sale). Since I’m only 4 years older than them, I have no historical data to go by.

    When I was 22/23, I just got out of university and was looking for my first job, how are these kids affording these places? Parents helping/advising them, using their name? maybe. Could it be purely based on speculation, a guaranteed profit?

    If the market wasn’t so hot in the last few years, would the kids still buy?

    Maybe the kids are just smarter and wiser these days…

  18. WoodenHorse

    megatron: By the time every idiot knows it’s a good idea only the idiots are doing it.

  19. homestyle

    Unless interest rates or unemployment rise significantly, any correction will likely be a slow bleed, rather than a “crash”.

    That’s how the last two played out. It took years to reach the bottom. “Slow motion train wreck” and all that.

    But it’s going to happen, just not this spring apparently…

  20. Snick

    I still believe we track the Californis market. The “Southland” area, to be exact. Every graph of every economic boom/bust has shown the EXACT same things/timing here.

  21. Pop Goes the Bubble

    “Unless interest rates or unemployment rise significantly, any correction will likely be a slow bleed, rather than a “crash”.”

    How about too much supply, and exhausted demand?

    The economic calamity to hit the US has not materialized just yet, but some housing markets are already correcting. (It’s not just the US; the Brits are getting their comeuppance in Spain)

    Regardless was Rob says, an investment is worth only what it returns over costs, so what will a negative equity and negative cash flow investment be worth?

  22. robchipman

    pop goes the bubble/jack/grey skies….

    You’re clearly making assumptions that fly in the face of reality. I can’t argue that an investment is worth more or less than what it returns over costs, and wouldn’t try to, but that’s a theoretical argument. The fact is that if you apply your criteria to the real world you’ll find that some investments sell for more than they are worth and some sell for less than they are worth. That’s not controversial. Its self-evident. You’d have to be a fool to dispute it.

    A negative equity investment is, on the surface, worth less than you paid for it. That much is clear. The variables are how long you’ve owned it, what the cash flow has done, what tax advantages have accrued and what its allowed you to do.

    A negative cash flow investment is only negative because the buyer wants it to be negative cash flow. Its negative cash flow quality doesn’t carry over from one owner to the next. Two identical properties side by side can be purchased differently, so that one is neg cash flow and the other is positive. The market will cause them to go up or down in value the same way, regardless of whether they are positive or negative. I think we can all agree that if every piece of property sold last year in Vancouver was purchased on a neg cash flow basis they would have still gone up in value. Does that mean there’s a relationship of some kind between neg cash flow and price appreciation? Obviously not, and that applies both ways.

    Its curious that you put so much stock in what will happen, even while you admit that it hasn’t happened yet. The best you can come up with is taht the Brits are getting their “comeuppance” with holiday property in Spain? Is it just Brits in Spain? And do they somehow deserve it for some kind of transgression?

    Btw, your logic fails when you say “The economic calamity to hit the US has not materialized …It’s not just the US; the Brits are getting their comeuppance” My advice to you is think less about clever handles and more abotu what you’re writing 😉

    Snick:

    If you’re saying we track a specific California market rather than all of California, I can’t disagree in theory. Whether by coincidence or because we share similar features with Southland you may be right. I haven’t seen historical graphs (if you’ve got some please share) but some quick research on DataQuick found:

    “March 14, 2007
    La Jolla,CA—-Southern California’s housing market sent out more mixed signals last month: Sales fell to a decade low while prices inched up to a new record, a real estate information service reported…Last month’s sales were the lowest for any February since 1997, when 15,772 homes sold. Since 1988 February sales have averaged 18,631. A decline in transactions from January to February is not unusual… The median price paid for a Southern California home was a record $495,000 last month, up 2.1 percent from $485,000 in January and up 5.3 percent from $470,000 in February last year. The previous record was $490,000, reached in both June and December of last year…Last month’s 5.3 percent annual rise in the median was the highest gain since July 2006, when the $487,000 median rose 5.9 percent”.

    I don’t quote that to convince everyone that everything is rosy. Somewhere else in that huge pile of stuff I saw concern that rising median price combined with falling sales volumes is a problem. There is some good stuff there.

    http://www.dqnews.com/RRSCA0307.shtm

  23. coco

    Rob,

    Was the majority of sales condos once again? I liked how you broke down the sales yesterday into the volumes and property types selling.

  24. Never posted before (honestly)

    “Two identical properties side by side can be purchased differently, so that one is neg cash flow and the other is positive.”

    Yet the intrinsic value or economic value does not change.

    No different than speculative stocks which pay no dividends and continue to appreciate in value.

    However at some point valuations must have some connection with reality such as PE ratios.

    I suggest to you Rob, at some point (I suspect the time is soon) property values will be determined by their economic output, which shelter and perhaps a little premium for inflation is hedging.

  25. News Flash

    “I still believe we track the Californis market. The “Southland” area, to be exact. Every graph of every economic boom/bust has shown the EXACT same things/timing here.”

    LA is up 145% in the last 5 years.

    Vancouver is up 100% in the last 5 years

    Not quite exact, but I guess there is still room on the upside for Vancouver to make your statement true.

  26. Geezer

    Kudos to Whitebear who said:
    “What you are seeing as a housing boom is nothing other than the loonie losing its purchasing value year after year.” and ” The loonie has lost close to 40% of its value against Gold just in the last 5 years.”

    I raised this issue in a previous post. The world is currently awash with devalued paper money. If the goverment of Canada was honest and traded our existing paper dollars for “New Dollars” worth 60 cents each do you think people would gladly accept the same number of “New Dollars” for their property or do you think asking prices might go up?

    To put it another way, the sellers of that $500k condo may actually only be asking $300k in real (2002) dollars. The sad reality is that most folks have seen their incomes equally devalued (with respect to gold and RE, etc.,) and that makes the prices seem so obscene. At some point it will put a ceiling on prices (or huge upward pressure on pay) but we don’t seem to be there yet.

    I remember about 25-30 years ago advising friends that they were insane to pay $80k for a very well maintained old west side house around 10th & MacDonald. The fundamentals made no sense but these folks ingored my well meaning advice because they were sure they were about to be priced out of the market forever – sound familiar?

  27. poster x

    Geez: How long will, the savers which own the bonds, which finance Re, continue to lend their money for a negative return?

    Double digit interest rates soon?

    Gold over 1k/oz?

    Only realtors can know for sure.

  28. Deedub

    Too many brain dead anonymous posters. I quit this blog. Good luck with your investments Rob.

    Another bear bites the dust – after throwing in the towel and buying back into the market.

    This predicition business is tough! 😉

  29. Snick

    NEWS FLASH,

    May 4th, 2007 at 5:39 pm
    “I still believe we track the California’s market. The “Southland” area, to be exact. Every graph of every economic boom/bust has shown the EXACT same things/timing here.”

    LA is up 145% in the last 5 years.

    Vancouver is up 100% in the last 5 years

    News Flash,

    This just in…I said…our market “tracks” the same way as California. Why? Beats me. But, we do, nevertheless.

    Rob, if you have not seen the graphs I have seen. perhaps you should not infer that I am mistaken?

  30. Skeptic

    Snick, so following your theory, prices in Vancouver will continue to rise for at least another year ?

    That’s what is happening in Southland, see the link http://www.dqnews.com/RRSCA0307.shtm. So are you disputing these figures ? Where are your graphs that seem to be central to your argument ?

    Prices in Southland, California are still rising, what am I missing here ?

  31. Snick

    Prices may still be “rising”. As many of us know, these are median prices which reflect a diminished share of the overall market.

  32. Skeptic

    Any proof ? Is this what your ‘graphs’ show ?

    You are stating this as a fact, is it a fact (i.e. prove it) ?

  33. unskeptic

    Hi skep, don’t pay attention to the bears. My wife works in a dentist office on the west side, and she hears really smart people in the know, and they are all saying that RE in Vancouver is gonna go up, because a lot of Chinese people are going to move here

  34. dyugle

    Shiller index is based on SAME home sales not the median and it is down in California. The median is up in SoCal as more expensive homes are still selling and the cheaper ones are not. Sub-prime borrowers bought the low end have been shut out of the market.
    145% in LA in US$ versus 100% in Vancouver in CDN$ in the last 5 years. Which is the greater return?

  35. millionpitfall

    A lot of chinese people will sell if the chinese stock market tanks too.

  36. Skeptic

    “A lot of chinese people will sell if the chinese stock market tanks too.”

    And a lot more will buy if it doesn’t….

  37. Skeptic

    We have looked at a lot of homes for sale and most of them are chinese sellers. They are not upgrading they are moving out of the country. Go figure.

  38. millionpitfall

    Skeptic,

    That post didn’t turn out right, sorry about that.
    We have looked at a lot of homes for sale and most of them are chinese sellers. They are not upgrading they are moving out of the country. Go figure.

  39. Skeptic

    “The median is up in SoCal as more expensive homes are still selling and the cheaper ones are not.”

    This may be a valid argument, has anybody got any hard data or facts ?

  40. Skeptic

    “We have looked at a lot of homes for sale and most of them are chinese sellers. They are not upgrading they are moving out of the country. Go figure.”

    Time for one of Rob’s reports from the trenches ! Why are all the Chinese leaving ?

  41. unskeptic

    Report from the trenches:

    I think the market is getting white hot again. Many people finally realize that Vancouver is a world class city

    The many miles of sandy beaches, the vibrant diversified economy, many world company headquarters, world class IT center, the reasonable cost of living, the
    huge net migration, no gridlock, no gangs, no crime, no homelessness, no drug addicts lined streets.

    And oh yeah, I forgot, it rains only enough to keep the place green

    Wait until the exposure we get from the Olympics,
    the school closures will end!

  42. M-

    Skeptic:
    The Shiller index proves it. The Shiller index looks at repeat sales of the same houses. The Shiller index is down, meaning that if your property sold for $100K last year, now it sells for, say, $96K, but median sale prices are up.

    Simple logic:
    If median sale prices are up, but values have dropped (per the S&P/C-S index), that means that the lower-cost properties aren’t selling.

  43. Domus

    So Rob, how did the week end?
    It was a respite for bulls, did it end that way as well?
    Numbers hungry……..

  44. thomas

    there’s two different chinese markets. some people who moved here from Hong Kong in the 90’s are now moving back, because their kids have graduated from UBC, and the parents want to retire back in Hong Kong. The kids may work here or elsewhere. On the other hand, recent purchases have been partly driven by mainland Chinese moving to Vancouver to now raise their children here. This is particularly true at the higher end of the market. Therefore the lack of FTB’s would not necessarily mean an end for higher end Vancouver real estate, as its not wholly depenent on people trading up.

  45. -A-

    Rob, you have on many occasions said the market would eventually turn, as it always does.

    Judging from some of your visitors to your blog, it seems that this time it may be different.

  46. homestyle

    Pop Goes the Bubble: “How about too much supply, and exhausted demand?”

    Yes, these factors could cause a correction to occur, but unless people are forced to sell (or the bank is selling for them), the bubble won’t “pop”.

    As they say, “prices are sticky on the way down”. People are loathe to sell at a real or perceived loss, but prices will retreat as speculators gradually realize their negative cash flow “investments” aren’t appreciating at 15% a year anymore.

    Of course, if some trigger event were to occur, ie. bird flu pandemic, 9/11 #2, Chinese stock market crash, insert bad event here, it could play out differently…

  47. tqn

    sky is falling sky is falling…people are beating this RE prices to death. I wish there was a filter in this site…
    someone said, the market does what it always does. if people overextended themselves, let them be their own judges. we are not even able to take care of our own finance, why worry about others’. if prices keep increases, accept it. if prices is falling, great, what are you gonna do about it?

    some said price is gonna fall by 50%; i am gonna buy two e. van SFH for the price of one. if price keep increasing, i already have a roof over my head regardless owning or renting…

  48. robchipman

    Some interesting comments here.

    Jack/notskeptic/greyskies/:

    The rent a property generates is one of the determinants of price. Commercial property aside it is not the exclusive determinant, and never will be, regardless of what the market does. That’s painfully obvious to most people. If its not obvious to you then you’d consider a 1 bedroom Whalley apartment a safer investment than a two bedroom and den townhouse on Kits Point.

    Snick:

    Re-read the posts. I’m not inferring that your mistaken. I’m giving your position some credibility and asking for more information.

    Geezer:

    Excellent point. Its been said before that inflation is the elephant in the room. Will it become the 400 pound gorilla?

    Millionpitfall (and others):

    Stop impersonating other posters. Its juvenile behaviour.

    unskeptic:

    Regarding “drug addicts [sic] lined streets…”, did you see the news report on 4 cruise ships hitting town, finding no taxis and wandering into the DTES? Where exactly do you think that kind of MSM reporting is leading?

    Numbers later today, all, once the sun goes down. I’m taking advantage of nice weather to work on the house!

  49. robchipman

    I should have said that either millionpitfall and skeptic share a computer (with skeptic using two), or else millionpitfall was faking a conversation with himself by posting as skeptic.

    If you share computers, let me know. If you don’t stop impersonating skeptic.

  50. may

    Chinese stock market won’t crash, it may adjust a bit, but it will not crash as it did in US long time ago. I posted at the end of april that 1st week of may will see a strong sales. 7 days of chinese national holiday give many people timeoff to come here buying houses. Rob, do you have any figures that how many of those sales are bought by Chinese people? past 1 yr and a half chinese stock market almost trippled itself, the competition we are facing is truly globe.

  51. may

    not National holiday, it is labor day in China.

  52. Tor

    If you don’t like to have your IP displayed to the world, installing tor may be a good idea.

  53. accountant88

    may wrote:
    May 5th, 2007 at 11:14 am

    “7 days of chinese national holiday give many people timeoff to come here buying houses”

    I would think that the foreigners who could afford to buy a house here are not the average 9 to 5 workers. They would be the richer folks who would just get on a plane whenever they want to and fly to Vancouver to buy. Why would they wait for a 7 day holiday?

  54. robchipman

    Tor wrote:

    “If you don’t like to have your IP displayed to the world, installing tor may be a good idea”

    Of course, you could just use one name or avoid impersonating others. That’d work too 🙂

  55. Snick

    Ah! Now people are assuming off-shore money will inflate housing prices once agian. Grasping at straws….

  56. -A-

    Rob, why not tell the visitors to this blog you are collecting data from them?

  57. dyugle

    Rob
    When you down load all the sales data do you get only the current sale price or the previous sale price and date as well. I am wondering cause if you get the previous sale price and date it would then be possible to construct a Shiller index for Vancouver. Probably a lot of work but nothing a macro or two couldn’t solve. I am sure there are some good programmers here and I could give it a try myself if you have the data. Just a thought and keep those numbers coming. Thanks for the work.

  58. robchipman

    Jack/greyskies/-A-/neverpostedbeforehonest:

    I’m not collecting data on anyone. Yes, I can see your IP. Yes, you could argue that WordPress is collecting data on you. Drop by my office, I’ll give you a quarter, and you can call someone who cares.

    I posted your IP because I think the readers of this blog deserve a little consistency. Its nice to know who’s commenting. If you don’t like that, don’t comment. If you want to comment but don’t want your IP posted, don’t change your handles with each post. If you don’t want your posts deleted don’t toss in unwarranted personal attacks. Pretty simple stuff.

    If I catch someone impersonating someone else I might just post their IPs too. Scary, eh?

    We’ve got a pretty good thing going here. I post info that a lot of people find interesting. They make some good comments. Don’t screw it up just because you can. You know that if you say anything close to intelligent it gets to stay. If you don’t, well, let’s face it: its easier for me to delete you than it is for you to write. There isn’t much sense in us having a peeing contest.

  59. robchipman

    dyugle:

    To get previous sale data you’d need to download the individual listing. You don’t get it with the bulk download. A tech savvy guy could probably do it easily.

    There are two levels of downloads, I guess. I execute a search in MLXchange and get the results. I can then mark an individual listing or group of listings, download the info and look at each one. At that time I can see history, taxes, map, etc.

    For my daily numbers I just execute the search and get the totals, which I then export to Excel and manipulate in my ham handed fashion.

    In short, there is a ton of info available.

  60. -A-

    Rob, you are working with incomplete info.

  61. -A-

    If somebody hacks into my system, and I loose important information, I will be seeking a little more than a quarter.

    You should edit the post which contains my IP address.

  62. aetakeo

    -A-; I’m a programmer. I promise you that any time you connect anywhere, the server you’re connecting to knows your IP address. (That’s the way the protocol works; it’s how info comes to you.) Rob’s not doing anything special; he’s got only the same info that every single webpage you go to has unless you’re cloaked. You wander around the world telling people your IP, Browser type, and referrer, among other things.

    As far as people hacking into your system goes: having your IP is not having keys to your house, it’s having your address.

    If you have a firewall, you’re good. It’s like locking your front door. Yeah, a concerted criminal with B&E on their minds might work on hacking you, but it would have to be worth it to them. If you’re the CEO of a company and you’re surfing on your machine that also has the plans to a cold fusion system, then switch surfing machines, and take the cold fusion off the network. Otherwise, there’s little of interest on your machine.

    Most of the school kids out there rattle doors; if they’re locked, the kids tend to move on.

    I believe your IP means that you’re on Shaw. (No, I’m not being spooky; you get to know the “neighbourhoods” when you see them around. ‘Sides, I might be wrong, you could be with a subsidiary.) I think Shaw offers a free firewall to subscribers, and XP Service Pack 2 has one built in.

    There are random scanners around all the time, and they’re way more of a hassle to you than Rob putting your IP out there.

  63. -A-

    aetakeo: thanks, maybe dial up is the way to go if I am going to confront the hypsters.

  64. robchipman

    -A-

    Since you asked, I’ll edit the posts. But hey, behave, ok?

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